One Journey Ends and Another Begins

WHATS NEXT YOU ASK?

Or maybe you don't ask...but if you do, here ya go.

As most of you reoccurring readers know, I'm off of the Pacific Crest Trail for the remainder of the year. If you're new to the blog, well, now ya know. When I made the decision to get off of the PCT, it wasn't easy. I was making a decision that was going to impact the rest of my year, and who knows what else. After I left Portland and flew home back to Ohio, I was immediately welcomed back by all of my friends and family. The first day back in Ohio I was lucky enough to attend one of my best friends' wedding reception. It was a beautiful night as everyone laughed and hung out into the evening. After three days at my parents house in Canton, OH, I meandered on down to Cincinnati to do some work for a friend of mine. He needed some photos of a few houses taken as well as some appliances moved and general labor help. I needed some quick cash, so my buddy Danny and I went down for a couple of days. Cincinnati is a pretty rad city, and I'd be lying if I didn't say that I almost stayed in Ohio because of the opportunities in Cincinnati. Although my decision could have been easy, I decided to stick with my original plan. 

Orignial Plan?

Surprisingly enough, while I was in Lassen National Park eating breakfast at JJ's Cafe, I was on the phone with the same good friend mentioned above, Danny. I'm talking to Danny on the phone outside of the cafe and all of the sudden a man walks behind me as I'm mentioning something about Denver, CO. He interrupts briefly to inform me that him and his wife own a gardening service in Denver. "Come over and talk to us after you're off the phone, man!" he belts out as he strolls away. I did just that.

After about 20 minutes of conversation about the trail, what I'm doing, and what I'll be doing after the trail, both Chris and Amy, the two owners, offer me a seasonal gardening gig in Denver whenever I get off trail. Now, to be honest, I really didn't give it much thought at that very moment. To be completely open, at that point I hadn't give anything much thought other than how I was going to finish the PCT. Although I had obviously thought about what I would do, and when, after I got off trail, I wasn't sure what that would be. I knew I had 100 days, I guess I was just obvious to the fact that the time was finally there. Ducky and I strolled off into the National Park and the moment passed. 

Fast forward to the last day on trail before I headed to Portland. 

I was debating on exactly what I wanted to do as we all sat in the hotel room. I knew it was decision time, but I just wasn't sure what I had in store for me. As you may know, I had a few options. One of those said options was taking the seasonal gig in Denver for the rest of the year and figuring the rest out once I got there. I mulled over it for the rest of the day, and when the time finally came to head to Portland with Scooter, my mind was made up. Now, it wasn't just an 'easy' decision, as some would probably like to assume. I really could have gone, and still could, go back to corporate if I every so choose. I could stay in Canton, and pay $200 less per month just for rent alone, not even calculating in other expenses that are higher in Denver and other cities. I could have gone back to Columbus, only to fall rightly so back into my routines. I could have stayed and been comfortable. 

I asked myself, "Would I regret this? Would I take a risk?" 

I answered yes to both questions.

I would go to Denver after a week at home, work for Amy and Chris, and figure the rest out. My main motivations weren't for the money, because after all, gardening doesn't pay too much, but more for the location. After working in corporate sales for the majority of the last three years in between thru hikes, I knew that I didn't want to immediately go back into an office, but I definitely needed to work. Although gardening isn't the most lucrative job, I'm at the point where I'll gladly sacrifice some pay for a less stressful, more enjoyable gig that doesn't drive me up a wall into insanity. 

I drive a 2009 Nissan Versa. I bought it after I got home from the CDT. Funny enough, I sold my Honda Element before I started the CDT. It's white, has a slight rattle in the exhaust, is manual, and is the very base model they made. No power anything. No cruise. No AC. Neemor, Scooter and I took it 7,000 miles across the country and back with no problems. Well, next to no problems. I trusted it to get me to Colorado once more, so the 1,100 mile journey began out of Cincinnati. I said my goodbyes to Danny, Jiries, and Jay and got ready to here the hum of a car for the next 24 hours. I don't mind driving for long distances, just like I don't mind walking for long distances, I suppose. I got some quick snacks at the gas station, filled up my Nalgene and hit it. Indiana and Illinois flew by, and then Missouri felt like it dragged on forever. Not until I got to Kansas did I realize how much I truly hate 70West. It's one road. Forever. 

I slept for 6 hours from 11-5 and woke up in a daze. I tried to drive for another hour and a half before I ended up pulling off on a country dirt road and zonking for another 2 hours. I was exhausted, but with only 7 hours left, it would be over before I knew it. I pulled into my good friend Justin's apartment as my eyes began to get heavy again. Turns out, Justin's roommate is traveling for work and never even moved into the place. His open room is going to be vacant for the foreseeable couple of months. I wasn't planning on getting a place due to the cost of the rent here in Denver, but the opportunity was too good to not take it. Although the apartment isn't in Denver Proper, it's not far. Just a short 20 mile drive outside the city is the Centennial / Aurora area. Only about 40 minutes from Boulder and almost equal distance to Colorado Springs, it's a damn good location. I was planning on living out of my car and spending most of my time at the coffee shop, in the mountains, or at the climbing gym, but life always has a different plan. I brought in the two boxes of clothes and gear that I brought with me an that was it.

I'm now living in Denver. 

Sonic ascending Bierstadt last June

Sonic ascending Bierstadt last June

I have a few goals while I'm out here, and they all revolve around photography and the mountains. I'm in the process of putting a list together of the 14'ers I'd like to summit before the season is up, and my hopeful and maybe ambitious goal is around 20 of them. I only have Saturday and Sunday each weekend, but I'm going to make the most of each day. During the week I'll be going to work, just as most of us do, from 8-4, then either writing, editing, or filming. Somewhere in the time after work I'll be fitting in some training runs at the local state park near me to work on sprints, hills, and tempo runs. I want to be in shape to where I can link together a dew 14'ers in one go, meaning I need to keep the shape I'm currently in.

As far as the photography portion of the reason I moved to Denver; I'm going to immerse myself in the outdoor industry here and really try and start working more with brands, small companies, and people who have an awesome product or idea. I want to film for companies. I want to take photos for brands who represent the values and ideas that I value and hold close as well. I want to shoot rad climbers sending insane routes. I want to hop out on the trails and shoot Ultras and work with people who have a vision. Not only that, but with the real estate market as good as it is here, I want to capitalize on some additional work in that market. Although real estate photography would never be my first option as a profession, it is something I'm relatively decent at and enjoy. Some of the houses I've shot are quite pretty and have some intricate architecture to them. Really, when I look at it from a broad perspective, Denver is a place I think I can really thrive at. I think there's enough of what I love here to make it worth while for me to pursue something here.

Red Bass climbing the ridge towards the summit of Parkview on the CDT

Red Bass climbing the ridge towards the summit of Parkview on the CDT

After all, I moved here voluntarily with the initial intention of living out of my car.  

Be on the look out for a Trip Report from every 14'er I summit this year. My next project is based here in Colorado, and I'm incredibly excited to share it with you.

One for the Books | New Adventures are on the Horizon...

I've been relatively quiet as far as writing and blogging goes in the past few weeks, but it's not because I didn't want to write. It was actually quite the contrary. I wanted to sit down and write at my favorite coffee shop just a block over, but I haven't had the chance. I've been busy. Actually, I've been so busy I haven't had the chance to do anything but get through the holidays. I've been focusing heavily on my photography as well as strengthening and maintaining relationships with people who are close to me, and combining these things with the Holiday Season, well, you can imagine; I've been tired.

Leading up to the New Year, I had pretty much exhausted any last bit of energy I had left after this years hiking season. When I got home in late October of this past year, I wasn't sure what the hell I was supposed to, or even going to be doing for that matter. I was home almost a month earlier than I expected with no plan, or really any interest in forming a plan. I had zero clue in which direction I wanted to take the first step in. Slowly but surely, however; things have fallen and are still falling into place.

Slowly.

This past year was one for the books quite honestly. I finally traveled out West starting this summer off with Moab, the Pacific Northwest, and then eventually leading me to the start of the CDT in Glacier National Park on July 7th.

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 As the year crept along, I found myself so completely enthralled with the CDT that I didn't think I would ever want to quit hiking. As the jeep roads twisted and turned throughout Montana and Idaho, I found solace in the wide open expanse of Big Sky country. I met unbelievably good, kind hearted people who were all in search of something different out on the CDT. I scrambled across miles of scree and talus to get to the peaks that lay within the Wind River Range. I lost myself to the night skies in Wyoming each night. With millions of stars lighting up the sky each night, it was hard to not contemplate everything about my existence. I pushed my own limitations in the high desert of the Great Basin where I found what I was truly capable of. I enjoyed every minute of my walk from Glacier National Park to Winter Park, Colorado, which is where I left the CDT in search of something more. When I left, I wasn't quite sure it was the best decision. After all, the CDT was a beautiful, magnificently open trail that had hundreds of opportunities awaiting. However; proceeding on the CDT at that time would have put me in a situation I didn't want to be in, hence leaving the trail to pursue a thru hike on the Long Trail in Vermont, one of my favorite states.

Here I am though, writing this, completely into the idea of what would have happened if I finished the CDT on the road, jeep roads, or skipped ahead. Who knows. Just thought I'd add in that its always in the back of my head. Every day.

At the Wyoming Border

At the Wyoming Border

I said goodbye to Red Bass, Mayor, Stomp, Hummingbird and Merlin, and within seconds, everyone I had learned to care about over the last few months was gone. Along the roads of Colorado, my friends dispersed into their own, utterly terrifying place in time. When it all came down to it, as I knew would happen at some point, everyone wanted, and needed, to follow their own ideals. To continue on whatever path they desired. For whatever reason, I felt at ease when I finally sat there alone, smoking a cigarette, actually talking to myself. I waited for someone to respond, but no one did. I stood up, walked to the coffee shop with my pack on, and began writing on a napkin. I called Scooter and things fell into place.

I left the CDT in hopes of finding something more than the road. Something more challenging than just skipping ahead or walking around the problem, and then at the end of it all claiming something that I don't even feel happened. Seriously, I feel like if I would have skipped ahead, walked around, or taken some sort of bullshit route through 400 miles of Colorado, I would have felt cheated. I would have felt like a piece of the puzzle was missing. So I didn't do it. I took a flight from Denver, CO to Philly the next day. 

The funny thing is, when I was in the Basin in Wyoming, Scooter and Wankles had been taunting me with text messages of the Long Trail. However; at the time, I really couldn't fathom getting off the CDT, so I pushed it away in the back of my mind, but left it to hover, to manifest slowly in hopes that something would come of it. Although I wanted to hike the LT, originally, I was trying to convince them to do a Winter LT hike, but it didn't catch on. Surprisingly enough, I'll talk a little more about this later.

So there I found myself, in the airport for the first time to catch my first ever flight. Yes, I've never flown on a plane up until this year. You heard it right. No planes. Not once. Never. Not because I didn't want to, but because it never was an option I suppose. I arrived in Philly not too long after my brief conversation with Scooter and Wankles. The following day, all of a sudden we were in New England. The day after you ask? On the Long Trail. Within two days, I had left Colorado, flown to Philly, drove to New England with my buds, and hopped on the Long Trail. It was bound to be good.

Northern Terminus of the Long Trail

Northern Terminus of the Long Trail

The Long Trail brought a lot of much needed change to my year. I was so wound up and focused on beating the weather on the CDT that I kind of forgot how much I enjoy everything that revolves around hiking, not just the actual hiking. With Scooter and Wankles on the LT, we had big plans to not only have as much fun as possible, but to also produce something creative. Have something tangible that we could hold, or show people from the trail. The Long Trail is the oldest hiking trail in the US, but honestly, there isn't too much info, photos, or detailed accounts of it. It's not hiked nearly as much as the AT, PCT, or other trails, mostly because it's incredibly difficult. So anyways, after 20 days on the Long Trail, 273 miles were hiked through the rugged Green Mountains. Wankles was on trail for 65 miles, all of which were insanely hysterical, enjoyable, and one of my favorite weeks on trail. We were sad to see him go, but family took hold back in Indy and he flew out a few days after we stayed at his Aunts house. 

Scooter and I pushed through the LT in a relatively moderate pace, pushing some days, chilling most of the others. We had a blast staying at a hostel or two, taking our time on days where we were a little more resentment for the cold, one hundred percent focusing on having a blast, but also making our deadline. Time was of the essence, but we still managed plenty of time to shoot, record, push ourselves, and have a blast. We finished the trail with a glorious feast at Papa Johns, and went our separate ways. Those 3 ish weeks were three of my favorite weeks. I think I can speak of the both of us when I say that the LT was a blast. Life on the Long Trail is something that you can expect to see a lot of coming up.

Scooter and I at the Southern Terminus of the LT. 

Scooter and I at the Southern Terminus of the LT. 

My hiking season was suddenly over. From July 7th to October 24th, I hiked roughly 2,000 miles through 5 states, multiple different environments, and with a damn good group of people. I expanded my horizons, both physically and mentally while pushing every limit I had. I was challenged by not only the relentless weather, stress, and danger on the CDT, and even more so by the never ending ascents and descents of the Long Trail. Sure, physically, it was a tough year. The CDT requires big mile days, and the weather is volatile, but really, the mental fortitude this year took surprised me. I wasn't expecting to have to make the decision of getting of the CDT, but I did.

This year has really been all about realizing that my own intentions and ideals require my, and only my thoughts and opinions. The transition of hiking, and living for others to doing something solely for myself has been interesting. It takes a little bit of time to get used to the idea of giving up social interaction to better yourself, but in time it all feels right and falls, and has fallen into place for me. Taking that step to leave the CDT has really been the turning point for my goals and aspirations for not only the hiking I'd like to do, but my life in general. It's hard to take that step, especially when it requires a sacrifice that you don't necessarily want to make. Nonetheless, it's been the right decision for me.

I'm back home in Ohio now, dividing my time between Columbus, and Canton. My friends and passions lie in Columbus, however; my photography work is mostly in Canton where I grew up. It's been a productive few months since I got back from the Long Trail. I've honed in my skills on both photography and rock climbing. Robo and Beehive both are incredibly determined climbers, so being around these guys constantly really boosts my confidence and drive. All of my friends down here in Columbus are all like minded individuals who want to work together to better themselves and each other. We all have the same common goals and interests. From our conversations, I've made improvements and taken steps to better myself and I owe it to them for being there for those moments and being such a big part of it.

From Robo and I’s trip to Chattanooga this past week. 

From Robo and I’s trip to Chattanooga this past week. 

With the changing into 2018 comes new adventures. This year is going to be a long, strenuous, mentally taxing year. I have a lot of miles in store for me, and along with the miles will come many smiles. Everything will be changing this February. In right around a month, you'll see what I'm talking about. Other than the unexpected coming up in a month, the PCT is on my agenda as well as finishing the CDT. This year is all about continuing that search for whatever keeps me going. Sometimes it's photography, sometimes it's hiking. Both of those things together have made for a good combination thus far, and I'm looking forward to pursuing it even more. My plan for February involves a good friend of mine and something that hasn't been done before. We can't disclose too much information yet, but I will say, when we do, and if things go as we hope, it'll be worth the wait.

With a new year and new adventures comes new obstacles and challenges. It's not all just sunshine, rainbows, beautiful vistas and awesome campsites. To be honest, those are few and far between on the long trails of the US. Time is once again going to be of the essence this year. I'm going to have prioritize appropriately throughout the entire year if I want to accomplish my goals. 

All in all, 2017 was the best year of my life. With everything that happened, I'm surprised it turned out the way it did, but I'm ecstatic that so much occurred in such a short amount of time. I think with time comes appreciation, and the more I hike and the more I travel and form relationships with people, the more I'll appreciate the very reasons I hike. Time is going to keep ticking away, but I plan on making the most of it.

Cheers to another epic year spent doing what we each love.