Colorado 14'ers: Bierstadt, Sawtooth, Evans Combo

BIERSTADT, SAWTOOTH, EVANS COMBO

In the world of climbing, peak bagging, and hiking, Colorado has some of the most accessible routes in the country, let alone the world. Throughout the entire state, there are *58 mountains that are 14,000' or higher. Some of these peaks are easier than others, attracting large crowds on weekends; and I mean it. With the likes of Grays and Torreys, as well as Bierstadt and Evans all within an hour and a half or so of Denver, some are more popular than others. When I arrived in Colorado last year, within 24 hours I had done Bierstadt. 

Before I even moved to Colorado just a week ago, I told myself that I would do at least one 14'er every weekend until I can't anymore, so what a better way to start my 14'er conquest than to do Bierstadt again, but this time do the Sawtooth Traverse and Evans all in one go.

ACCORDING TO 14'ERS.COM:

Exposure: 3/6

Class 3 Scramble

Gain: 3,900ft

Length: 10.2 miles

Start: 11,669'

Evans Summit: 14,264'

A few days before I planned on an attempt at the Combo Route, I messaged Reptar on Instagram to see if he was interested in possibly tagging along on the supposed 10.25 mile route that would tag two 14'ers along the way. At first, he seemed to be a bit hesitant when I mentioned that it included a class 3 scramble, but after some consideration, he eventually agreed and we planned to drive together. We hadn't talked about logistics until the Thursday night, and soon enough we had agreed to camp the night before so we could get a good start on the day. 

I left work on Friday at around 3 P.M and headed to REI first. I needed a new pair of shoes since my Timps are pretty much shot at this point and were beginning to give me some foot problems the last few days on trail. I snagged a pair of Tops Athletic MT2's and headed towards Reptar's place to pick him up and head for the mountains. 

Reptar and I had never actually hung out, but when I got to his place, we immediately started talking about trail and it was like I had just met him on a thru hike. The traffic started when we got on the highway and what would normally be just over an hour drive for us turned into nearly a two hour drive. After snaking up and around the switchbacks leading up to Guanella Pass, we finally arrived at the parking lot that would lead us to Bierstadt. We got out as the sun was beginning to set and packed our bags. We would go find a flat spot to sleep at, take some photos of the night sky, or at least we hoped, then crash. Turns out, the Meteor Shower was beginning to kick up and within moments the Milky Way was shining bright as meteors fell from the sky, creating a striking beam of light across the night sky each time. 

My headlight goes dim and I fall asleep.

Our 4:30 alarm sounded right on time, and as life would have it, when we woke, everything was covered in a thick layer of frost. My down quilt; completely soaked and frozen to the feather. My backpack that lay next to me; frozen. Shoes; frozen. We decided to pack up and go get warm in the car before we even thought about starting to hike. Turns out, we were both pretty exhausted and fell back asleep in the car for another hour and a half. I woke up as the sun was beginning to make its way behind the Sawtooth Ridge. I looked in my rear view mirror and I noticed a line of people outside of the toilet. Cars everywhere. People everywhere. Seems about right.

We hurried and got our bags packed again and started the Alpine Meadow walk up towards Bierstadt.

Our start time: 7:00 AM. 

The first mile or so of the hike includes some extremely mellow boardwalks. The switchbacks begin within a half mile, but don't begin to get steep for a little while. The trail is very well maintained, and as I mentioned above, there were people everywhere. We would pass a group while they were breaking, then we would leap frog as Reptar and I stopped to eat and catch our breath. Although I just got off the PCT, I haven't been at 12,000'+ for a few months. Reptar just summited Grays and Torrey's a couple of weeks ago, but he doesn't spend much time at elevation either as he is working quite a bit. Our packs held not much more than a half days worth of food, two liters of water each, and some extra layers in case the weather rolled in. The forecast was calling for sunny blue skies essentially all day, so I wasn't worried too much about the weather. 

14'ers - Bierstadt - Sawtooth - Evans-5.jpg

Switchback after switchback eventually led us to a plateau where we had some of the most surreal lighting on the Sawtooth. We stopped for a bit once again to take photos, and enjoy the hike up. We needed to pace ourselves so we had energy for the ridge and Evans. One more push to the base of the rock scramble would get us in striking distance. We slogged up and eventually passed nearly 75 people as we made our way to the base. Low and behold; another 25 at the base of the summit. Maybe more. At this point, Reptar and I were both pretty perplexed. I did Bierstadt last year on a Saturday and I don't recall this many people being on the mountain, but hey, its just as much theirs as it is mine. 

A sea of people awaited us at the top, and within a few minutes of getting to the top, we were on our way down with a new friend we had just met, Polar. His real name is Mark, but he was in the military and he mentioned that people used to call him that, so thats what I'll refer to him as. He asked if we were doing the Sawtooth and he questioned, "Mind if I tag along with you guys?". "Not at all!", we replied. Another set of eyes is always good to have while route finding, especially on a route you've never been on.

We began the descent towards the Sawtooth from the summit of Mt. Bierstadt at around 11 AM or so, give or take. The first thing we all noticed was the lack of any real trail. Exactly what I expected, but daunting nonetheless. We found our way down the talus field and eventually began to traverse boulders more comfortably with each step. Scree lay below most of the talus, so I stuck to the hopping and continued up, down and around until we got to the first outcropping. All three of us felt very confident up to this point. There isn't any real exposure on the descent towards the saddle, but a lot of the talus is quite unstable. Footing is very important here. We meandered slowly up and down, painstakingly making our way towards the west ridge where the class 3 begins. Polar was leading the route for a bit, but before we all knew it, I was in front and stayed in front for the remainder of the hike. I prefer to jump from boulder to boulder, so I left most of the scree routes up to them. I would rather traverse a few class 3 moves than go down a scree field, so catch me on the boulders. 

Sawtooth from Bierstadt

Sawtooth from Bierstadt

Now mind you, I had the route and the photos saved onto my phone so I could access them even in airplane mode, so I frequently was checking them to make sure we were on route. Each time I rounded a corner, or hopped onto a loose rock, I would relay the outcome back to Reptar and Polar. 

We finally reached the las outcropping. We had two options for a route to get around it and to the West Ridge. Either up and over, which is shorter, or around, which is the longer way. We opted for around just to be sure of the terrain and keep the risk to a minimum. Although it did take longer, it was worth it to know that there wasn't a huge risk of getting cliffed out on the other side of the outcropping. We each successfully navigated the last outcropping and got to the notch where we would begin the Class 3 section of the traverse. Although Reptar is apparently afraid of heights, I didn't see anything that would to elude to the fact up until we got to the West Ridge where the catwalk and scrambles were. Once we finally arrived at the true traverse and the crux, I could see that Reptar was beginning to let the fear get to him. He had been talking about how nervous he was all morning, but to be honest, he was much less afraid of the descent off Bierstadt than I was. Loose talus and scree worry me more than a few class 3 moves, but to each their own. 

Third and Final Outcropping

Third and Final Outcropping

Reptar ascending the talus and scree field

Reptar ascending the talus and scree field

14'ers - Bierstadt - Sawtooth - Evans-9.jpg

I continued to lead the class 3 route. Reptar was behind me, and Polar behind him. The West Side of the Ridge includes a few traverses, some extremely narrow catwalks, and a few actual class 3 moves. From a distance, the Sawtooth looks much more menacing and fear inducing, but when you actually arrive to the ledges, it's fairly stable. I avoided the scree at all costs, causing me and the rest of the group to take the high route on the last traverse. One can either hike under the overhang and up a steep slope of scree, or hike up and above the boulders, and traverse a few ledges which eventually turn to solid ground with plenty of space to feel secure. 

For me, the Class 3 moves were no problem, and since I don't generally have a fear of heights, the traverse wasn't that bad. For Reptar, who is afraid of heights, it was a different story. He powered through each and every obstacle, but I'd be lying if I said he did it with ease. I could tell the exposure was getting to him, especially as he crawled on all fours under rocks and over rocks to avoid going near the ledge. After each catwalk, we would take a break for everyone to catch their bearings. I would constantly yell back to the group with reports on the boulders and sections ahead. We were constantly communicating our moves, which is essential in these types of adventures that include some dangerous terrain. With the possibility of a rockfall, a slide, or any number of other issues going wrong at any point, it was nice to have constant updates, especially when a member of the group is not so keen on exposure. 

Class 3 Scrambling on the Sawtooth

Class 3 Scrambling on the Sawtooth

At last, we reached the notch where we would start our ascent towards Mt. Evans. The route at this point goes from a Class 3, immediately to Class 2 hiking as the ascent begins. It's a fairly steep grade, and with no real trail for a few tenths of a mile, the route throws some more navigating at you. Giant pieces of granite lay across the plateau and in the distance Mt. Evans is waiting. In between the crest of the ridge to the actual summit lay a couple of miles of boulder hopping, rock scrambling, and cairn following. Eventually, you pop over a bump on the ascent and begin to climb slowly towards the top on the outskirts of the mountain.

We began the ascent towards Mt. Evans at around 1:30 P.M from the end of the Sawtooth. We had taken much longer on the Sawtooth than we expected, and at this point, we were behind schedule by quite a bit. We didn't really have anywhere to be, so as long as the weather held up, it could take us all day and we wouldn't really have cared.

The slog up Mt. Evans began and at first we enjoyed the slow ascent towards the actual ridge line, but soon enough, as it always does, the trail got steeper, rockier, and more technical. Although it's only Class 2, the talus makes for some fairly unstable footing. We took a break roughly every quarter mile at this point. Reptar and Polar were feeling the altitude, lack of water and food much more than I was, but I wanted to stick together as a group. We only packed out two liters of water and some snacks, and we were starting to run a bit low on everything. The breaks were beginning to stack up, and by the time we got within striking distance of Mt. Evans, it was getting close to 4 o'clock. We were expecting to be down at the car no later than 5. We summited around 3:30 after getting some water from a couple at the parking lot. 

Looking back towards the ridge line from Mt. Evans.

Looking back towards the ridge line from Mt. Evans.

We enjoyed the summit of Mt. Evans for awhile. After all, it took us a hell of a lot of time to get there. Although there were more tourists on Evans than Bierstadt possibly, it is a helluva view. The ridge descending Evans back towards the plateau is fairly prominent, and with a few extra steps you can get some awesome views from nearly every direction. Reptar and I had packed out a beer each to enjoy on the summit, so we cracked them and cheersed. Although we were done with the ascent of both mountains, the descent was apparently just as tricky and possibly even more dangerous than the ascent. How great!

We ended up pounding our beers and all three of us headed down the ridge and descended Mt. Evans at around 4:00 P.M.

Mountain Goats!

Mountain Goats!

Another one!

Another one!

14'ers.com says that after descending the ridge off of Evans back towards the notch, you head NW into the open area towards a Gulley. We did just that. I eventually ran off down the mountain and made sure that the Gulley I was looking at matched up with the photos on the app. It sure did, but it is MUCH steeper than the photos make it look. I was surmised we had to hike down the gulley in front of me, but before I knew it I was off and the others were right behind me. After all the time I spent avoiding the scree on the Sawtooth, I was rewarded with nothing but it on the descent! Rocks slid, moved, and crumbled beneath me as I made haste of the first section of the descent. It seemed to be about a 1,300' descent in far less than a mile. I could feel the pain in each of my knees as I put more and more pressure on them as the terrain became less stable and even steeper. The trail eventually began to disappear and in place of it was more scree. The gulley just kept going. Boulder after boulder. Loose rock, with more loose rock in front of it. Eventually, we started to make out the parking lot off in the distance. The gulley would spit us out at the opposite side of the meadow as the Bierstadt Trail. This means that once we got to the end of the Gulley, we would have to navigate our way through roughly one mile of thick willow trees. It just so happens that these willow's are right next to a river, which creates plenty of mud pits, or a bog if you will. 

We waded through the willows for what seemed like much longer than a mile.

Reptar and I pushed on ahead and ended up waiting every 10 minutes or so for Polar and our new friend Jacob to catch up. Jacob caught up to us as we were getting ready to enter the Gully, and he had no idea of the route he was taking down. He said he was all too stoked to find other people on the way down, otherwise he was planning on taking the wrong ridge he said. 

The minutes kept ticking, and soon enough, the sun was beginning to set on the horizon. What we thought would be a six to eight hour hike, was turning into a 12 hour day. We weren't expecting the Sawtooth to take so long. We took the entire hike fairly leisurely until we really had to when it came to the Class 3 moves. 

The willows ended and we found ourselves back at the car just around 7:00 P.M, nearly 12 hours after we left the car earlier that morning.

FINAL THOUGHTS ON THE ROUTE:

Although 14'ers.com said that the route was only 10.2 miles, both my GPS tracker and Polar's said it was closer to 13.5-14.0 miles. It definitely was longer than 10.2, I'll tell you that much. I would plan for a long day if you're not acclimated to the altitude or to the terrain. The route is fairly difficult in some sections, but a lot of the Sawtooth is much more daunting from the car than it is when you actually get on it. 

I really enjoyed the route, especially the scrambling and the Sawtooth. Polar and Reptar weren't too big of fans of the route until we actually got done with it, but it was different. The route kept throwing us curveballs from the start to the finish. We had an exorbitant amount of people to wade through on top of Bierstadt. The initial freight of looking down at the Sawtooth. Dealing with the unreal amount of scree and talus on the descent. The Class 3 scramble. The West Ridge and it's exposure. The nonstop, relentless boulders that kept coming on the ascent to Mt. Evans. Mountain goats. The wildly steep descent down the gulley to the willows. This route had everything and I would most certainly do it again. I thought the route was well put together. It thinned out drastically once we descended from Bierstadt, so it was nice to have a more relaxed change of pace rather than the sea of people up top. 

Overall, it was a challenging, but very rewarding hike with some exposure that I felt comfortable with, which made for an epic day. Thanks to Reptar for joining me on the route!

Next up: Gray's and Torreys via Kelso Ridge / Keep an eye out.

One Journey Ends and Another Begins

WHATS NEXT YOU ASK?

Or maybe you don't ask...but if you do, here ya go.

As most of you reoccurring readers know, I'm off of the Pacific Crest Trail for the remainder of the year. If you're new to the blog, well, now ya know. When I made the decision to get off of the PCT, it wasn't easy. I was making a decision that was going to impact the rest of my year, and who knows what else. After I left Portland and flew home back to Ohio, I was immediately welcomed back by all of my friends and family. The first day back in Ohio I was lucky enough to attend one of my best friends' wedding reception. It was a beautiful night as everyone laughed and hung out into the evening. After three days at my parents house in Canton, OH, I meandered on down to Cincinnati to do some work for a friend of mine. He needed some photos of a few houses taken as well as some appliances moved and general labor help. I needed some quick cash, so my buddy Danny and I went down for a couple of days. Cincinnati is a pretty rad city, and I'd be lying if I didn't say that I almost stayed in Ohio because of the opportunities in Cincinnati. Although my decision could have been easy, I decided to stick with my original plan. 

Orignial Plan?

Surprisingly enough, while I was in Lassen National Park eating breakfast at JJ's Cafe, I was on the phone with the same good friend mentioned above, Danny. I'm talking to Danny on the phone outside of the cafe and all of the sudden a man walks behind me as I'm mentioning something about Denver, CO. He interrupts briefly to inform me that him and his wife own a gardening service in Denver. "Come over and talk to us after you're off the phone, man!" he belts out as he strolls away. I did just that.

After about 20 minutes of conversation about the trail, what I'm doing, and what I'll be doing after the trail, both Chris and Amy, the two owners, offer me a seasonal gardening gig in Denver whenever I get off trail. Now, to be honest, I really didn't give it much thought at that very moment. To be completely open, at that point I hadn't give anything much thought other than how I was going to finish the PCT. Although I had obviously thought about what I would do, and when, after I got off trail, I wasn't sure what that would be. I knew I had 100 days, I guess I was just obvious to the fact that the time was finally there. Ducky and I strolled off into the National Park and the moment passed. 

Fast forward to the last day on trail before I headed to Portland. 

I was debating on exactly what I wanted to do as we all sat in the hotel room. I knew it was decision time, but I just wasn't sure what I had in store for me. As you may know, I had a few options. One of those said options was taking the seasonal gig in Denver for the rest of the year and figuring the rest out once I got there. I mulled over it for the rest of the day, and when the time finally came to head to Portland with Scooter, my mind was made up. Now, it wasn't just an 'easy' decision, as some would probably like to assume. I really could have gone, and still could, go back to corporate if I every so choose. I could stay in Canton, and pay $200 less per month just for rent alone, not even calculating in other expenses that are higher in Denver and other cities. I could have gone back to Columbus, only to fall rightly so back into my routines. I could have stayed and been comfortable. 

I asked myself, "Would I regret this? Would I take a risk?" 

I answered yes to both questions.

I would go to Denver after a week at home, work for Amy and Chris, and figure the rest out. My main motivations weren't for the money, because after all, gardening doesn't pay too much, but more for the location. After working in corporate sales for the majority of the last three years in between thru hikes, I knew that I didn't want to immediately go back into an office, but I definitely needed to work. Although gardening isn't the most lucrative job, I'm at the point where I'll gladly sacrifice some pay for a less stressful, more enjoyable gig that doesn't drive me up a wall into insanity. 

I drive a 2009 Nissan Versa. I bought it after I got home from the CDT. Funny enough, I sold my Honda Element before I started the CDT. It's white, has a slight rattle in the exhaust, is manual, and is the very base model they made. No power anything. No cruise. No AC. Neemor, Scooter and I took it 7,000 miles across the country and back with no problems. Well, next to no problems. I trusted it to get me to Colorado once more, so the 1,100 mile journey began out of Cincinnati. I said my goodbyes to Danny, Jiries, and Jay and got ready to here the hum of a car for the next 24 hours. I don't mind driving for long distances, just like I don't mind walking for long distances, I suppose. I got some quick snacks at the gas station, filled up my Nalgene and hit it. Indiana and Illinois flew by, and then Missouri felt like it dragged on forever. Not until I got to Kansas did I realize how much I truly hate 70West. It's one road. Forever. 

I slept for 6 hours from 11-5 and woke up in a daze. I tried to drive for another hour and a half before I ended up pulling off on a country dirt road and zonking for another 2 hours. I was exhausted, but with only 7 hours left, it would be over before I knew it. I pulled into my good friend Justin's apartment as my eyes began to get heavy again. Turns out, Justin's roommate is traveling for work and never even moved into the place. His open room is going to be vacant for the foreseeable couple of months. I wasn't planning on getting a place due to the cost of the rent here in Denver, but the opportunity was too good to not take it. Although the apartment isn't in Denver Proper, it's not far. Just a short 20 mile drive outside the city is the Centennial / Aurora area. Only about 40 minutes from Boulder and almost equal distance to Colorado Springs, it's a damn good location. I was planning on living out of my car and spending most of my time at the coffee shop, in the mountains, or at the climbing gym, but life always has a different plan. I brought in the two boxes of clothes and gear that I brought with me an that was it.

I'm now living in Denver. 

Sonic ascending Bierstadt last June

Sonic ascending Bierstadt last June

I have a few goals while I'm out here, and they all revolve around photography and the mountains. I'm in the process of putting a list together of the 14'ers I'd like to summit before the season is up, and my hopeful and maybe ambitious goal is around 20 of them. I only have Saturday and Sunday each weekend, but I'm going to make the most of each day. During the week I'll be going to work, just as most of us do, from 8-4, then either writing, editing, or filming. Somewhere in the time after work I'll be fitting in some training runs at the local state park near me to work on sprints, hills, and tempo runs. I want to be in shape to where I can link together a dew 14'ers in one go, meaning I need to keep the shape I'm currently in.

As far as the photography portion of the reason I moved to Denver; I'm going to immerse myself in the outdoor industry here and really try and start working more with brands, small companies, and people who have an awesome product or idea. I want to film for companies. I want to take photos for brands who represent the values and ideas that I value and hold close as well. I want to shoot rad climbers sending insane routes. I want to hop out on the trails and shoot Ultras and work with people who have a vision. Not only that, but with the real estate market as good as it is here, I want to capitalize on some additional work in that market. Although real estate photography would never be my first option as a profession, it is something I'm relatively decent at and enjoy. Some of the houses I've shot are quite pretty and have some intricate architecture to them. Really, when I look at it from a broad perspective, Denver is a place I think I can really thrive at. I think there's enough of what I love here to make it worth while for me to pursue something here.

Red Bass climbing the ridge towards the summit of Parkview on the CDT

Red Bass climbing the ridge towards the summit of Parkview on the CDT

After all, I moved here voluntarily with the initial intention of living out of my car.  

Be on the look out for a Trip Report from every 14'er I summit this year. My next project is based here in Colorado, and I'm incredibly excited to share it with you.